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05/Feb/2020

Learn something new! Here is a whole routine to consider to do at your health level (ask your physician first). There are modifications to most exercises to find where you are at. Just starting? Try looking up a video for each, slowly do one new exercise each day!

One new movement is speed skating exercise. Here is how it is done:

Copyright Oakley Women

 

Here is a full workout to try to do each movement for 1 minute.

Get full details at https://www.livelifefit.com/blogs/blogging-my-fitlosophy/85787521-go-red-in-feb-try-this-14-min-heart-healthy-workout including a link to a fit record book. 

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17/Jan/2020

What piece of exercise equipment sells for under $20, fits into a briefcase, can be used by the whole family, and improves cardiovascular fitness while toning muscle at the same time? And using it for just 15-20 minutes will burn off the calories from a candy bar? The answer: a jump rope.

Jumping rope is a great calorie-burner. You’d have to run an eight-minute mile to work off more calories than you’d burn jumping rope. Use the WebMD Calorie Counter to figure out how many calories you’ll burn for a given activity, based on your weight and the duration of exercise.

“It’s certainly good for the heart,” says Peter Schulman, MD, associate professor, Cardiology/Pulmonary Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington. “It strengthens the upper and lower body and burns a lot of calories in a short time, but other considerations will determine if it’s appropriate for an individual.”

He sees rope-jumping as something fit adults can use to add spice to their exercise routine. “You’re putting direct stress on kneesankles, and hips, but if done properly it’s a lower-impact activity than jogging.”

Source https://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/features/skipping-rope-doesnt-skip-workout#1


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17/Jan/2020

Whatever your resolutions are for 2020, be sure to make your annual wellness appointment for you and everyone in your family.

Annual wellness checks helps your PCP to determine the general status of your health. The exam also gives you a chance to talk to them about any ongoing pain or symptoms that you’re experiencing or any other health concerns that you might have.

A physical examination is recommended at least once a year, especially in people over the age of 50. These exams are used to:

  • check for possible diseases so they can be treated early
  • identify any issues that may become medical concerns in the future
  • update necessary immunizations
  • ensure that you are maintaining a healthy diet and exercise routine
  • build a relationship with your PCP

https://www.healthline.com/health/physical-examination#purpose


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29/Nov/2019

Don’t get stranded this winter without a survival kit at the ready.  A few simple and inexpensive items kept in your vehicle can make all the difference should you or your family find yourself stranded on the side of the road in winter weather.

 

Many of you may have read the story about the man who survived while stranded in his car by eating ketchup packets.  We may chuckle at the idea, but it points to a reality for many of us who live in areas where the road conditions and weather can be unpredictable.  While we always hope for the best, a little preparation can go a long way to help you feel safe and secure while traveling this winter. That’s why we’d like to suggest that you create your own stranded car survival kit in the event that anything should happen.  Just knowing it’s there will give you peace of mind, and we’ll feel better knowing that you are taking care of yourself even when you aren’t visiting our facility.

The best survival kit is one that is easy to find and ready for use, so find a plastic container that can hold all of your items.  Not only does it keep items dry, you’ll be able to locate everything you need without having to sort through a pile of CDs, fast food wrappers and random ice scrapers.  Your kit should contain at a minimum the following items:

  • Bottled drinking water.
  • High energy, non-perishable snacks such as unsalted nuts, energy bars or any kind of high protein fitness snack or dried fruit.
  • An extra blanket.
  • A first aid kit containing basic supplies such as bandages, antibiotic ointment, gauze tape, cold compress and scissors.
  • A compass, whistle and reflective vest in the event that you must leave your vehicle.
  • Matches.
  • Duct tape.
  • A rain poncho.
  • Fire extinguisher.
  • A flashlight with extra batteries.
  • A car charger for your cell phone.

Any additional items that might help you get yourself unstuck such as a shovel, cat litter for traction and extra clothing that would keep you warm while you are outside are also helpful.

In addition, make sure that your spare tire is inflated and that you have access to the correct tools necessary to change a tire.

Hopefully you’ll never need to use any of these items, but if you should find yourself in a situation where you are stranded, you’ll be prepared to either free yourself from that snowbank or remain comfortable while you wait for assistance.  And if you have a few ketchup packets in the glovebox, all the better.

 


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26/Nov/2019

We’ve all seen those movies when a couple strolls through a beautiful winter scene holding hands and singing about their love for each other, a rosy glow on their cheeks.  While these scenes are entertaining, the reality is that they are actors who are most likely strolling through fake snow in a studio in California. For those of us who take our strolls in the reality of a Nebraska winter, whether it’s to feed livestock or walk the kids to the bus stop, we rarely sing and we’re certainly not dancing (unless hopping from one foot to the other in an attempt to manufacture some body heat counts as dancing.)

Given the reality of the Nebraska winters, we’re more than willing to throw fashion out the door and do what it takes to survive in the wind and snow.  Layering is a must and a good pair of boots with adequate traction will not only keep your feet from getting wet while scooping snow but will help prevent falls.  A winter coat, gloves and a scarf will also keep you comfortable while you brave the elements. Coats made of nylon, polyester or water-proof fabric will protect you from moisture while an inner layer of wool or fleece (think cozy sweater) will help insulate your body.

If you’ve ever been called hot-headed, it’s true.  Heat escapes through our heads, so a knitted hat will help you maintain a more comfortable body temperature.  And don’t forget to cover your ears; they aren’t naturally prepared for cold weather, so keep them tucked under your hat or under a pair of ear muffs.  Plus, if someone is busy telling you how hot-headed you are, you can just ignore them and blame it on your ear coverings.

Our fingers and toes are also vulnerable when it comes to the biting cold.  Waterproof gloves with extra padding are the best way to go and a thick pair of wool socks will keep your toes from complaining.  And if you do find yourself holding hands with someone special while you take in the beauty of the season, you won’t have to worry about sweaty palms.  It’s a win-win for everyone.


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26/Nov/2019

For anyone who has endured influenza, the idea of getting a flu shot each winter is a welcome one.  The thought of experiencing the achy muscles and discomfort again are enough to inspire anyone to stay up to date with their flu shot.  For those who are still on the fence about whether or not a shot is really necessary, keep in mind that a quick trip to the doctor for a flu shot can save you days in the future of being down with the flu.  In addition, flu season aligns perfectly with the holiday season, making it even more important for you and your loved ones to take a moment to update your flu shot to avoid missing the real spirit of the season and all the celebrations, family gatherings and good food that come with it.

While you might be thinking it’s too late to get your flu shot, the real upshot of the situation is that a flu shot at any point of the flu season is better than no shot at all.  For caregivers, parents and expecting mothers, it’s important to remember that taking care of yourself makes it possible for you to care for others. And for many folks, especially those who are older or might have compromising health issues, a shot can mean the difference between life and death.  In short, there’s really nothing to lose by getting your shot but everything to gain should you come in contact with the virus.

So give yourself the gift of health this holiday season and get your flu shot!  It’s worth a shot, right?

 

Stop in at the Butler County Clinic during regular business hours for your flu shot.


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08/Oct/2019

Halloween Safety Tips: Research before you buy your costumes!

From the candy to the costumes, Halloween is a fun-filled time for kids and parents. To help make it a trick-free treat, follow these simple safety tips.

Dressing Your Little Ghouls & Goblins

  • Choose a light-colored costume that’s easy to see at night. Add reflective tape or glow-in-the-dark tape to the costume and to the trick-or-treat bag.
  • Only buy costumes labeled “flame-retardant.” This means the material won’t burn. If you make your own costume, use nylon or polyester materials, which are flame-retardant.
  • Make sure wigs and beards don’t cover your kids’ eyes, noses, or mouths.
  • Masks can make it hard for kids to see and breathe. Instead, try using non-toxic face paint or makeup.
  • Don’t use colored or decorative contact lenses, unless they’re prescribed by a licensed eye doctor.
  • Put a nametag — with your phone number — on your children’s costumes.
  • To prevent falls, avoid oversized and high-heeled shoes. Make sure the rest of the costume fits well too.
  • Make sure that any props your kids carry, such as wands or swords, are short and flexible.

Trick-or-Treating Basics

Kids under age 12 should:

  • always go trick-or-treating with an adult
  • know how to call 911 in case they get lost
  • know their home phone number or your cellphone number if you don’t have a landline

Older kids who go out on their own should:

  • know their planned route and when they’ll be coming home
  • carry a cellphone
  • go in a group and stay together
  • only go to houses with porch lights on
  • stay away from candles and other flames
  • know to never go into strangers’ homes or cars

For all kids:

  • According Safe Kids Worldwide, the risk of kids being hit by a car is higher on Halloween than on any other day of the year. So make sure all kids:
    • walk on sidewalks on lit streets (never through alleys or across lawns)
    • walk from house to house (never run) and always walk facing traffic when walking on roads
    • cross the street at crosswalks and never assume that vehicles will stop
  • Give kids flashlights with fresh batteries. Kids may also enjoy wearing glow sticks as bracelets or necklaces.
  • Limit trick-or-treating to your neighborhood and the homes of people you know.

When kids get home:

  • Help them check all treats to make sure they’re sealed. Throw out candy with torn packages or holes in the packages, spoiled items, and any homemade treats that weren’t made by someone you know.
  • Don’t let young children have hard candy or gum that could cause choking.

Keep Visiting Ghouls Safe Too!

Make sure trick-or-treaters are safe when visiting your home too. Remove anything that could cause them to trip or fall on your walkway or lawn. Make sure the lights are on outside your house and light the walkway to your door, if possible. Keep family pets away from trick-or-treaters, even if they seem harmless to you.

Halloween Goodies — What You Give Out and What Kids Get

  • Make Halloween fun for all — including kids with food allergies. Consider buying Halloween treats other than candy. Stickers, erasers, crayons, pencils, coloring books, and sealed packages of raisins and dried fruits are good choices.
  • As you inspect what your kids brought home, keep track of how much candy they got and store it somewhere other than their bedrooms. Consider being somewhat lenient about candy eating on Halloween, within reason, and talk about how the rest of the candy will be handled. Let kids have one or two treats a day instead of leaving candy out in big bags or bowls for kids to eat at will.
https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/halloween.html

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