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06/Mar/2020

Healthy Shamrock Shake

See full details at https://joyfoodsunshine.com/healthy-shamrock-shake/
This Healthy Shamrock Shake recipe is made with 8 nutritious ingredients like avocados, spinach; Greek yogurt & is ready in 5 minutes! The perfect St. Patrick’s Day treat that’s naturally dyed green! No food coloring!
 Prep Time5 minutes
 Total Time5 minutes
 Servings4 Servings
 Calories175.8kcal
 AuthorLaura

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup milk
  • ½ cup vanilla honey Greek yogurt
  • 1 avocado
  • ½ tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup spinach frozen
  • 10-15 fresh mint leaves
  • 2 TBS honey
  • ½-1 cup ice optional

Instructions

  • Add ingredients to your Vitamix (or other high-powered blender) in the order listed.
  • Blend, starting on low speed and gradually increasing to high until your mixture is smooth and homogenous.
  • Pour and serve immediately, top with whipped cream or chocolate!

Notes

Healthy Shamrock Shake: Ingredient Substitutions

There are a few easy ways to change up this Healthy Shamrock Shake to fit your dietary needs!

  • Greek Yogurt/Milk:  If you avoid dairy, you can easily substitute a dairy-free yogurt and almond or coconut milk to make this dairy-free! I recommend using honey or vanilla flavored yogurt. If you use plain yogurt, you will need to increase the amount of honey so that this Healthy Shamrock Shake is still sweet enough!
  • Honey: Feel free to use any liquid sweetener of your choice. Honey is by far my favorite!
  • Mint: If you’d prefer, you can use mint extract instead of fresh mint, however I love the flavor the fresh mint imparts in this healthy shamrock shake!

Nutrition

Calories: 175.8kcal | Carbohydrates: 19.1g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 10.1g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.8g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4.3g | Cholesterol: 10mg | Sodium: 53mg | Potassium: 351.7mg | Fiber: 3.1g | Sugar: 15g | Vitamin A: 930IU | Vitamin C: 8.7mg | Calcium: 105mg | Iron: 0.5mg
CourseDessert, Drinks
 CuisineAmerican
 Keyword healthy shamrock shake, homemade shamrock shake, shamrock shake recipe

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17/Jan/2020

What piece of exercise equipment sells for under $20, fits into a briefcase, can be used by the whole family, and improves cardiovascular fitness while toning muscle at the same time? And using it for just 15-20 minutes will burn off the calories from a candy bar? The answer: a jump rope.

Jumping rope is a great calorie-burner. You’d have to run an eight-minute mile to work off more calories than you’d burn jumping rope. Use the WebMD Calorie Counter to figure out how many calories you’ll burn for a given activity, based on your weight and the duration of exercise.

“It’s certainly good for the heart,” says Peter Schulman, MD, associate professor, Cardiology/Pulmonary Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington. “It strengthens the upper and lower body and burns a lot of calories in a short time, but other considerations will determine if it’s appropriate for an individual.”

He sees rope-jumping as something fit adults can use to add spice to their exercise routine. “You’re putting direct stress on kneesankles, and hips, but if done properly it’s a lower-impact activity than jogging.”

Source https://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/features/skipping-rope-doesnt-skip-workout#1


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17/Jan/2020

Whatever your resolutions are for 2020, be sure to make your annual wellness appointment for you and everyone in your family.

Annual wellness checks helps your PCP to determine the general status of your health. The exam also gives you a chance to talk to them about any ongoing pain or symptoms that you’re experiencing or any other health concerns that you might have.

A physical examination is recommended at least once a year, especially in people over the age of 50. These exams are used to:

  • check for possible diseases so they can be treated early
  • identify any issues that may become medical concerns in the future
  • update necessary immunizations
  • ensure that you are maintaining a healthy diet and exercise routine
  • build a relationship with your PCP

https://www.healthline.com/health/physical-examination#purpose


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26/Nov/2019

For anyone who has endured influenza, the idea of getting a flu shot each winter is a welcome one.  The thought of experiencing the achy muscles and discomfort again are enough to inspire anyone to stay up to date with their flu shot.  For those who are still on the fence about whether or not a shot is really necessary, keep in mind that a quick trip to the doctor for a flu shot can save you days in the future of being down with the flu.  In addition, flu season aligns perfectly with the holiday season, making it even more important for you and your loved ones to take a moment to update your flu shot to avoid missing the real spirit of the season and all the celebrations, family gatherings and good food that come with it.

While you might be thinking it’s too late to get your flu shot, the real upshot of the situation is that a flu shot at any point of the flu season is better than no shot at all.  For caregivers, parents and expecting mothers, it’s important to remember that taking care of yourself makes it possible for you to care for others. And for many folks, especially those who are older or might have compromising health issues, a shot can mean the difference between life and death.  In short, there’s really nothing to lose by getting your shot but everything to gain should you come in contact with the virus.

So give yourself the gift of health this holiday season and get your flu shot!  It’s worth a shot, right?

 

Stop in at the Butler County Clinic during regular business hours for your flu shot.


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08/Oct/2019

Halloween Safety Tips: Research before you buy your costumes!

From the candy to the costumes, Halloween is a fun-filled time for kids and parents. To help make it a trick-free treat, follow these simple safety tips.

Dressing Your Little Ghouls & Goblins

  • Choose a light-colored costume that’s easy to see at night. Add reflective tape or glow-in-the-dark tape to the costume and to the trick-or-treat bag.
  • Only buy costumes labeled “flame-retardant.” This means the material won’t burn. If you make your own costume, use nylon or polyester materials, which are flame-retardant.
  • Make sure wigs and beards don’t cover your kids’ eyes, noses, or mouths.
  • Masks can make it hard for kids to see and breathe. Instead, try using non-toxic face paint or makeup.
  • Don’t use colored or decorative contact lenses, unless they’re prescribed by a licensed eye doctor.
  • Put a nametag — with your phone number — on your children’s costumes.
  • To prevent falls, avoid oversized and high-heeled shoes. Make sure the rest of the costume fits well too.
  • Make sure that any props your kids carry, such as wands or swords, are short and flexible.

Trick-or-Treating Basics

Kids under age 12 should:

  • always go trick-or-treating with an adult
  • know how to call 911 in case they get lost
  • know their home phone number or your cellphone number if you don’t have a landline

Older kids who go out on their own should:

  • know their planned route and when they’ll be coming home
  • carry a cellphone
  • go in a group and stay together
  • only go to houses with porch lights on
  • stay away from candles and other flames
  • know to never go into strangers’ homes or cars

For all kids:

  • According Safe Kids Worldwide, the risk of kids being hit by a car is higher on Halloween than on any other day of the year. So make sure all kids:
    • walk on sidewalks on lit streets (never through alleys or across lawns)
    • walk from house to house (never run) and always walk facing traffic when walking on roads
    • cross the street at crosswalks and never assume that vehicles will stop
  • Give kids flashlights with fresh batteries. Kids may also enjoy wearing glow sticks as bracelets or necklaces.
  • Limit trick-or-treating to your neighborhood and the homes of people you know.

When kids get home:

  • Help them check all treats to make sure they’re sealed. Throw out candy with torn packages or holes in the packages, spoiled items, and any homemade treats that weren’t made by someone you know.
  • Don’t let young children have hard candy or gum that could cause choking.

Keep Visiting Ghouls Safe Too!

Make sure trick-or-treaters are safe when visiting your home too. Remove anything that could cause them to trip or fall on your walkway or lawn. Make sure the lights are on outside your house and light the walkway to your door, if possible. Keep family pets away from trick-or-treaters, even if they seem harmless to you.

Halloween Goodies — What You Give Out and What Kids Get

  • Make Halloween fun for all — including kids with food allergies. Consider buying Halloween treats other than candy. Stickers, erasers, crayons, pencils, coloring books, and sealed packages of raisins and dried fruits are good choices.
  • As you inspect what your kids brought home, keep track of how much candy they got and store it somewhere other than their bedrooms. Consider being somewhat lenient about candy eating on Halloween, within reason, and talk about how the rest of the candy will be handled. Let kids have one or two treats a day instead of leaving candy out in big bags or bowls for kids to eat at will.
https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/halloween.html

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31/May/2019

We are excited to welcome Jean Meister to our team and also a new role to assist our community’s health. You may receive a call from Jean Meister as a followup or to assist you in planning care for a loved one. This team approach to one’s care pulls together information to best assist patients.

Our Care Coordinator works in collaboration with patients, especially those that are chronically ill, and patients who are at high risk for decline, their family, caregivers, clinic staff, physicians, hospital, specialty providers, and community resources in a team approach to:

  • Promote timely access to appropriate care
  • Assess health and social needs
  • Develop a care plan in collaboration with the patient, family, caregivers, and providers
  • Monitor adherence to the care plan, evaluate effectiveness, monitor patient progress, and facilitate changes as needed
  • Facilitate patient access to appropriate medical and specialty providers
  • Educate the patient about relevant community resources
  • Serve as contact point for patients between primary care and specialty services to facilitate timely communication, follow-up, and transitions in care for the patient
  • Follow up with patients when dismissed from the hospital or emergency room to assess needs and progress of their health condition
  • Complete Annual Medicare Wellness Visits to gather information, and organize in order to recommend proper preventative care and screening for optimal health of Medicare beneficiaries

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22/Sep/2015

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